Elizabeth Shaw chocolate factory: Residents protest in Easton against luxury housing

Elizabeth Shaw chocolate factory: Residents protest in Easton against luxury housing

Residents of Greenbank and Easton blocked the streets in protest of the new luxury housing development in the area.

The plans, approved by Bristol City Council, would build luxury housing and apartments on the site of the former Elizabeth Shaw chocolate factory on Co-operation Road.

Local residents were joined by the tenants’ union Acorn, who organised the protest.

Protesters are angry that the project is starting in one of the city’s most deprived areas, where people sleep on the streets and in vans.

Duncan Stanaway, a local resident and Acorn campaigner, said: “Bristol is in the middle of a really profound housing crisis.

“I live locally and was walking around the site last night, and there’s dozens of people who are sleeping in caravans and who are sleeping out.

“We need social and we need affordable housing. We’re here today to say to Generator South West ‘if you are going to develop this site, you need to put in social housing, so you are not pricing local people out, you’re not making the housing crisis and rental prices worse, but it’s actually a contribution to our community.”

 

Site of the old chocolate factory, Easton. Image credit: Daniel Hibbard.

Site of the old chocolate factory. Image credit: Daniel Hibbard.
Site of the old chocolate factory. Image credits: Daniel Hibbard.

The new development includes plans for homes, apartments and a community space.

Generator Group, the developers, got planning permission for the site several years ago now.

Last month, the developers confirmed that there was no plans for social or affordable housing.

The protestors were campaigning against the developers after they promised initially to build social or affordable housing.

Easton is one of the most deprived areas in Bristol and in the south-west of England.

Just over a third of children living in Easton are living in poverty, and this is part of a wider issue of child poverty in the city, as highlighted by the United Nations’ visit to the city recently.

As a city, Bristol is also experiencing large-scale issues surrounding housing and homelessness.

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